Telehealth Expected to Reach $106 Billion in Spending by 2023

Healthcare Finance News Logo

Telehealth Expected to Reach $106 Billion in Spending by 2023

The COVID-19 pandemic has driven a large shift toward telehealth and remote patient monitoring, particularly among patients with chronic conditions. A recent Doximity report shows that this trend is likely to continue beyond the public health emergency, with healthcare spending increasingly moving to virtual care. Patients have reacted positively to telehealth experiences, and about a quarter of patients surveyed say they intend to maintain telehealth services as part of their care going forward.

In 2020, virtual care is expected to account for more than 20% of all medical visits in the U.S., which in turn is projected to drive $29 billion in total healthcare services. Those numbers were revealed this week in Doximity’s 2020 State of Telemedicine Report, which also found that up to $106 billion of current U.S. healthcare spend could be virtualized by 2023. This highlights the high rates of adoption among both patients and physicians, and the impetus felt among providers to offer safe, secure and easy-to-use virtual services as demand for telehealth continues to grow.

“Telehealth is expected to drive $29 billion in healthcare services in 2020,” Healthcare Finance News

Read more at healthcarefinancenews.com and learn more about reimbursements for telehealth and RPM.

Telehealth Expected to Reach $106 Billion in Spending by 2023
Logo for Healthcare Innovation

Virtual Visits Without RPM Leave Gaps in Healthcare

While telehealth visits have provided an alternative to in-person office visits for some patients. Without an RPM solution, critical physiological information needed to make diagnoses and design treatment plans is missing.

Logo for Healthcare Innovation

Virtual Visits Without RPM Leave Gaps in Healthcare

While telehealth visits have provided an alternative to in-person office visits for some patients. Without an RPM solution, critical physiological information needed to make diagnoses and design treatment plans is missing.